Archive | Chiropractic RSS for this section

Michael Wagner Executive | Chief Marketing Officer | Expert Brand Builder | Global Business Driver

Buying a home in Miami-Dade is so expensive, it could hurt the economy

 

About Michael Wagner

Highly accomplished, visionary executive with proven ability to impact financial, social, and political goals through commitment to global issues, innovation, and diversity. Results-oriented, decisive leader offering 15+ years of success in sales, operations, and marketing. Deliver excellence in execution and developing people, utilizing international / multicultural experience to provide unique perspective and creative solutions, achieving high performance within diverse organizational cultures. Demonstrate rapid advancement based on high performance, with the ability to quickly transfer skills across industries. Self-starter with strong entrepreneurial spirit, high integrity, and solid work ethic; creative, highly analytical, and able to successfully manage multiple concurrent projects with keen attention to detail, excellent organization, and outstanding persuasive skills. Able to skillfully inspire, motivate, and lead teams for consistently winning outcomes.

Specialties: Commercial Property Insurance, Multi-State Schedules of Insurance, Revenue Growth, Executive Management, C-Suite Sales, AC Nielsen data analysis, IRI data analysis, Sales Strategy Formulation, Execution, Process Standardization, Consumer Goods, Profit/Loss Management, Sales Skills Training, Sales Performance Management, Business Development,Leadership Development,Team Building,Talent/Organizational Development, Recruiting,Marketing Campaigns,Google Ad Words, Social Media Technology,Google Places, Google+ Local, WordPress, Video Marketing,& Webinars

Dr. Oz’s Top 10 Health and Fitness Tips of All Time

Get Strong, Not Skinny

Illness or injury may often be the instigator, but frailty is what kills us, says Dr. Mehmet Oz, cardiothoracic surgeon, author, and host of The Dr. Oz Show. Our bodies can’t recover as well if we’re not strong, which is why he recommends a balanced workout plan that includes strength, cardio, and flexibility training.

This doesn’t mean you need to spend hours in the gym each week. The busy doctor has no problem fitting in his seven-minute workout every morning (check out the full routine here), which he says is better for you than the occasional hour-long gym session. And you can say goodbye to boring treadmill sessions. Instead, Dr. Oz suggests getting a basic pedometer and setting a goal of 10,000 steps per day (that’s about five miles) to stay slim and healthy

Michael Wagner Vero Beach FloridaExecutive | Chief Marketing Officer | Expert Brand Builder | Global Business Driver | 12,000 + Connections

IMG_1659

 

About Michael Wagner 

Highly accomplished, results-driven, leader with 15+ years of success in sales, marketing, business development, operations, and customer service. Proven record of achievement and demonstrated success driving multimillion-dollar revenue growth in highly competitive markets. Documented history of rapid advancement based on high performance, with the ability to quickly transfer skills across industries. Self-starter with strong entrepreneurial spirit, high integrity, and solid work ethic; creative, highly analytical, and able to successfully manage multiple concurrent projects with keen attention to detail, excellent organization, and outstanding persuasive skills. Able to skillfully inspire, motivate, and lead teams for consistently winning outcomes.

 

Success is a subjective notion, if there ever was one. But for simplicity’s sake, let’s assume the higher you are on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, the better you’re doing. In case you don’t remember the levels from Psych 101, essentially, people can’t be their best possible selves (self-actualization) until lower-level needs are met first. In other words, you can’t be an ideal version of yourself if you don’t have enough food and money to pay the bills, or enough love and esteem to feel good about your value as a human being. So, what can you do to move yourself up the pyramid?

Check out the findings from several studies, which shine a light on what it takes to achieve more in life.

Increase your confidence by taking action.

Katty Kay and Claire Shipman, authors of The Confidence Code, wrote a stellar article for The Atlantic on this subject. Highlighting scads of studies that have found that a wide confidence gap exists between the sexes, they point out that success is just as dependent on confidence as it is on competence. Their conclusion? Low confidence results in inaction. “[T]aking action bolsters one’s belief in one’s ability to succeed,” they write. “So confidence accumulates–through hard work, through success, and even through failure.”

Broaden your definition of authenticity.

Authenticity is a much sought-after leadership trait, with the prevailing idea being that the best leaders are those who self-disclose, are true to themselves, and who make decisions based on their values. Yet in a recent Harvard Business Review article titled “The Authenticity Paradox,” Insead professor Herminia Ibarra discusses interesting research on the subject and tells the cautionary tale of a newly promoted general manager who admitted to subordinates that she felt scared in her expanded role, asking them to help her succeed. “Her candor backfired,” Ibarra writes. “She lost credibility with people who wanted and needed a confident leader to take charge.” So know this: Play-acting to emulate the qualities of successful leaders doesn’t make you a fake. It merely means you’re a work in progress.

Improve your social skills.

According to research conducted by University of California Santa Barbara economist Catherine Weinberger, the most successful business people excel in both cognitive ability and social skills, something that hasn’t always been true. She crunched data linking adolescent skills in 1972 and 1992 with adult outcomes, and found that in 1980, having both skills didn’t correlate with better success, whereas today the combination does. “The people who are both smart and socially adept earn more in today’s work force than similarly endowed workers in 1980,” she says.

Train yourself to delay gratification.

The classic Marshmallow Experiment of 1972 involved placing a marshmallow in front of a young child, with the promise of a second marshmallow if he or she could refrain from eating the squishy blob while a researcher stepped out of the room for 15 minutes. Follow-up studies over the next 40 years found that the children who were able to resist the temptation to eat the marshmallow grew up to be people with better social skills, higher test scores, and lower incidence of substance abuse. They also turned out to be less obese and better able to deal with stress. But how to improve your ability to delay things like eating junk food when healthy alternatives aren’t available, or to remain on the treadmill when you’d rather just stop?

Writer James Clear suggests starting small, choosing one thing to improve incrementally every day, and committing to not pushing off things that take less than two minutes to do, such as washing the dishes after a meal or eating a piece of fruit to work toward the goal of eating healthier. Committing to doing something every single day works too. “Top performers in every field–athletes, musicians, CEOs, artists–they are all more consistent than their peers,” he writes. “They show up and deliver day after day while everyone else gets bogged down with the urgencies of daily life and fights a constant battle between procrastination and motivation.”

Demonstrate passion and perseverance for long-term goals.

Psychologist Angela Duckworth has spent years studying kids and adults, and found that one characteristic is a significant predictor of success: grit. “Grit is having stamina. Grit is sticking with your future, day in, day out, not just for the week, not just for the month, but for years, and working really hard to make that future a reality,” she said in a TED talk on the subject. “Grit is living life like it’s a marathon, not a sprint.”

Embrace a “growth mindset.”

According to research conducted by Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck, how people view their personality affects their capacity for happiness and success. Those with a “fixed mindset” believe things like character, intelligence, and creativity are unchangeable, and avoiding failure is a way of proving skill and smarts. People with a “growth mindset,” however, see failure as a way to grow and therefore embrace challenges, persevere against setbacks, learn from criticism, and reach higher levels of achievement. “Do people with this mindset believe that anyone can be anything, that anyone with proper motivation or education can become Einstein or Beethoven? No, but they believe that a person’s true potential is unknown (and unknowable); that it’s impossible to foresee what can be accomplished with years of passion, toil, and training,” she writes.

Invest in your relationships.

After following the lives of 268 Harvard undergraduate males from the classes of 1938 to 1940 for decades, psychiatrist George Vaillant concluded something you probably already know: Love is the key to happiness. Even if a man succeeded in work, amassed piles of money, and experienced good health, without loving relationships he wouldn’t be happy, Vaillant found. The longitudinal study showed happiness depends on two things: “One is love,” he wrote. “The other is finding a way of coping with life that does not push love away.”

 

 

Michael Wagner President | Executive Leader | Chief Marketing Officer | Expert Brand Builder | Global Business Driver

image133

 

Downtown Miami’s retail on track for a healthy 2016: report

Restaurants, in particular, have seen booming sales in recent years
February 02, 2016 05:45PM

Miami’s real estate markets are facing tough times because of floundering economies abroad, but at least one of the city’s sub-sector’s future is looking bright: retail, according to a newly released report.
The Greater Downtown area is seeing a huge influx of new development that is banking on Miami’s growing population and the city’s attractiveness as a tourist destination, according to the report from Integra Realty Resources.
Integra estimates that about 1.4 million square feet of new retail space is set to open in Greater Downtown Miami within the next three years. Much of that is located in Brickell thanks to the 505,000-square-foot Brickell City Centre, which is expected to launch this year. Some of the other projects in the pipeline include the similarly sized Miami Worldcenter — recently reimagined as “High Street” retail by its developers — and the shopping portion of Met Square.
New development isn’t the only section of the market that’s seeing growth: profit margins for a variety of businesses, most notably restaurants, have ballooned considerably in the last two years, the report said.
Downtown eateries cleared a whopping $735 million in sales during 2014, an increase of 78 percent compared to 2013. Banking and financial services also grew by 45 percent during the same time period, reaching $53 million.
On the flip side, general merchandise — the top earner at $837 million during 2014 — fell by 5 percent compared to 2013. Clubs and liquor stores also took a huge 80 percent hit, raking in $16.25 million in 2014.
So what’s driving this demand? The Integra report said at least part of it is due to population growth in the downtown area, which currently houses about 80,750 residents. The city’s Downtown Development Authority expects that figure to grow by another 11,769 people by 2019.
More than 4.4 million overnight visitors also hit the downtown area in 2014, accounting for $1.445 billion in consumer sales that year.
Those factors, coupled with the increase in office space bringing in businesses, equates to more people with disposable income than ever passing through shops and restaurants in the downtown area. — Sean Stewart-Muniz
About Michael Wagner

Highly accomplished, visionary executive with proven ability to impact financial, social, and political goals through commitment to global issues, innovation, and diversity. Results-oriented, decisive leader offering 15+ years of success in sales, operations, and marketing. Deliver excellence in execution and developing people, utilizing international / multicultural experience to provide unique perspective and creative solutions, achieving high performance within diverse organizational cultures. Demonstrate rapid advancement based on high performance, with the ability to quickly transfer skills across industries. Self-starter with strong entrepreneurial spirit, high integrity, and solid work ethic; creative, highly analytical, and able to successfully manage multiple concurrent projects with keen attention to detail, excellent organization, and outstanding persuasive skills. Able to skillfully inspire, motivate, and lead teams for consistently winning outcomes.